Browse & Buy


1852 Cracked Die Revb&b
COIN
1852 Adelaide Pound First or Cracked Die
QUALITY
about Extremely Fine
PROVENANCE
Private Collection NSW
PRICE
$88,000
COMMENTS
The collector that is keen to acquire an 1852 Cracked Die Adelaide Pound should not go past this piece. The coin will withstand the strongest scrutiny for it has minimal marks in both the fields and the edges. And at $88,000, it is well priced. Given that there are only forty Cracked Dies available to collectors we believe this coin is more than ‘well priced’. It is a ‘steal’. In consideration of the extreme rarity of Cracked Dies, we don’t preclude investors from this dialogue either.
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1852 Cracked Die Obvb&b

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This 1852 Adelaide Pound was minted at the Government Assay Office in Adelaide and was struck using the first reverse die that featured a beaded inner circle. The crack in the ‘DWT’ area of the legend confirms that it is indeed a famous Cracked Die, struck during the run of the first forty Adelaide Pounds.

From a technical perspective, this coin features the ‘thin’ crack.

There are about forty 1852 Cracked Die Adelaide Pounds available to collectors. And let’s be clear on this point. That’s forty coins across all levels of quality, from the very best to the very worst. 

1852 Adelaide Pound Cracked Die

The very best are so few and far between they command a half million dollar price tag making them out of reach financially for most collectors.

Now let’s consider the very worst examples. Because gold is a soft metal, well used Adelaide Pounds are in the main rough and ready and a bit unsightly. Some have even been gilded for mounting in jewellery.

Which is why we have no hesitation in recommending this coin.

Yes this 1852 Cracked Die Adelaide Pound has been used (slightly) but the rigours of circulation have treated the coin very kindly. 


1852 Adelaide Pound date side
COIN
1852 Adelaide Pound Second Die
QUALITY
good Extremely Fine
PROVENANCE
Private Collection Perth
PRICE
$ 38,000
COMMENTS
The quality standards that we adhere to in the selection of Adelaide Pounds maximises the coin's investment potential. It also underpins our philosophy of buying back coins from our clients. This Adelaide Pound for example. It was an outstanding example when we sold it to a Perth collector in 2004. The years have only re-affirmed that is remains an outstanding example today. A quality coin at a value price.
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1852 Adelaide Pound Second Die

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The 1852 Adelaide Pound is the nation’s first coin. It was struck at the Government Assay Office in Adelaide from 22 carat gold brought from the Victorian goldfields.

Its historical standing as Australia's first gold coin ensures that it will always be sought after.

Fulfilling our ‘wish list’ to find an Adelaide Pound that has circulated but has minimal marks and no obvious defects, is a challenging task.

Gold is a soft metal and the majority of circulated gold coins show serious blemishes including knocks to the edges: defects that are clearly visible to the naked eye.

Not so with this Adelaide Pound. It is impressive.

Accurately graded Good Extremely Fine with just a hint of wear to the high points, the edges are undamaged and there are minimal marks in the field.

This 1852 Adelaide Pound is an extremely attractive coin: one  that you would be proud to show your family and friends.

 


$20 pair
Notes
NOTE
1967 Coombs Randall $20 Consecutive Pair
QUALITY
Uncirculated
PROVENANCE
Private Collection Western Australia
PRICE
$12,500
COMMENTS
Guaranteed original, Uncirculated quality. And guaranteed rarity. The Australian banknotes that bear the Coombs Randall signature combination are scarce in all denominations from the One Dollar up to the Twenty Dollar. And the ‘Coombs Randall Twenties’ are the scarcest and most sought after of them all. While most banknotes are issued throughout a year, the Coombs Randall $20 notes were issued for only a matter of weeks, from mid-September 1967 until October 1967. This note is Australia’s rarest issued decimal banknote and the absolute ‘key’ to the series. Available individually or as a pair. Contact us for a single note price.
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$20 Hargraves

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The Australian banknote market is going through a process of re-invigoration courtesy of the Reserve Bank of Australia.

The overhaul of our polymer notes, commencing with the $5 last year and the $10 this year, is attracting a new audience to this collecting area.

And as always, once collectors become immersed in their area of pursuit they go back and collect earlier banknote issues.

Collectors will find acquiring the Coombs Randall Twenty Dollar banknote a significant hurdle to overcome. 

Why are Coombs Randall notes so scarce? Three factors:

  1. Australia’s decimal changeover was in the planning stage for years, involving the introduction of decimal banknotes and the withdrawal of our pre-decimal notes. To this end, the Government printed a massive quantity of the first decimal notes that featured the Coombs Wilson signature combination.
  2.  When banknote signatory Roland Wilson retired in 1966, notes featuring his replacement Richard Randall were simply not required until later in 1967 (and 1968 in the case of the $1 note).
  3. The retirement of Herbert “Nugget” Coombs in 1968 saw a new signature combination of Phillips Randall appear: a combination that lasted several years.

A surplus of the very first decimal banknotes - and a spate of retirements of our banknote signatories within a two year timeframe - has meant that less than 2 per cent of all 'Commonwealth of Australia' (1966-73) notes were issued in the name of Coombs & Randall.


$2 star notes Macarthur
Notes
NOTE
1968 $2 Coombs Randall Star Consecutive Pair
QUALITY
Uncirculated
PROVENANCE
Private Collection Western Australia
PRICE
$12,000
COMMENTS
COOMBS. RANDALL. STAR. Three words that define the extreme rarity of these notes. The Coombs Randall signature combination is the scarcest in the $2 banknote series. That these notes are ‘Star Notes’ makes them scarcer again. These extremely rare collectables are offered as a consecutive pair. While we believe a pair is an advantage, they are also available as single notes. Contact us for an individual price.
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$2 Farrah

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The Australian banknotes that bear the Coombs Randall signature combination are scarce in all denominations from the One Dollar up to the Twenty Dollar.

In the case of the Coombs Randall $2 notes, they were issued for a matter of months, from November 1967 until September 1968 and are the rarest $2 decimal banknote and the absolute ‘key’ to the series.

But this is not a standard Coombs Randall $2 note, this is a Coombs Randall $2 ‘Star Note’ which is rarer again.

Why are star notes so scarce?

Star notes were issued only between 1968 and 1971 and printed in a special run to replace those banknotes spoilt during the normal printing process.

The number sequence of the spoilt note(s) was maintained by reprinting the note with its first five digits and a star appearing in place of its sixth digit. (123456 – 12345*) This procedure was followed to maintain the numbering sequence of the bundle.

With the ever-increasing volume of new banknotes being printed the star replacement note system became impracticable and was no longer an option after 1971. 

After this time it was not deemed necessary to replace a damaged note with a star replacement note or to keep a bundle of 100 notes in numerical sequence, another random note was simply added until a total of 100 notes was achieved.

Why are Coombs Randall notes so scarce?

Three factors:

  1. Australia’s decimal changeover was in the planning stage for years, involving the introduction of decimal banknotes and the withdrawal of our pre-decimal notes. To this end, the Government printed a massive quantity of the first decimal notes that featured the Coombs Wilson signature combination.
  2. When banknote signatory Roland Wilson retired in 1966, notes featuring his replacement Richard Randall were simply not required until later in 1967 (and 1968 in the case of the $1 note).
  3. The retirement of Herbert “Nugget” Coombs in 1968 saw a new signature combination of Phillips Randall appear: a combination that lasted several years.

A surplus of the very first decimal banknotes - and a spate of retirements of our banknote signatories in a space of two years – are the reasons why less than 2 per cent of all 'Commonwealth of Australia' (1966-73) notes were issued in the names of Coombs & Randall.


1860 Aborigine Threepence Obv
COIN
1860 Hogarth & Erichsen Aborigine Threepence
QUALITY
Mint state, as struck
PROVENANCE
Sir Marcus Clark K.B.E, sold by James R Lawson 1954
PRICE
$195,000
COMMENTS
Colonial jewellers, Julius Hogarth and Conrad Erichsen gave indigenous Australians a voice when in 1860 they depicted an indigenous portrait on their privately issued silver threepence. It was thinking that was way ahead of its time. More than a century elapsed before a second indigenous portrait appeared on Australia’s coinage. In 1988, on our $2 coin, when the nation celebrated its bicentenary. Testimony to their social and historical contribution, the works of Hogarth and Erichsen are today held in Canberra’s National Library of Australia and National Gallery of Australia. And Melbourne’s National Gallery of Victoria and Sydney’s Powerhouse Museum.
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1860 Aborigine Threepence Rev

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This 1860 Aborigine Threepence is culturally significant and is presented in superb mint state, ex Sir Marcus Clark K.B.E Collection.

When James R Lawson Auctioneers sold the collection of the late Sir Marcus Clark in July 1954, his 1860 Aborigine Threepence (this coin) was placed in the sale alongside his Holey Dollars and his Dumps, such was the respect with which it was held.

Selling for £38, the Aborigine Threepence fetched more than twice that of an EF Dump (£18) and nearly double that of an Extremely Fine Cracked Die (£20) and a 1921 Square Halfpenny (£22).

And there is a reason. The threepence is far rarer. And the design is culturally significant as the only colonial piece to bear the design of an indigenous Australian.

The design of the 1860 Aborigine Threepence has made it an industry icon.

Struck in silver, a minuscule eight pieces of the 1860 Aborigine Threepence are known, with this piece acknowledged as the absolute finest. Presented as struck, in a mint state, the surfaces are proof-like.

As you would expect of a piece of this calibre, it comes with a well-documented pedigree, the property of foremost collector Sir Marcus Clark whose reputation for acquiring the very best is indelibly printed into the chronicles of numismatic history.

The sale of the Marcus Clark Collection in 1954 by auctioneers James Lawson Pty Ltd records the first public appearance of the Aborigine Threepence, where it sold for £38.

The piece was auctioned 27 years later, and in a fiercely contested bidding war, it sold for $23,000 on a pre-auction estimate of $12,500. 

The third appearance was in July 2007. The front cover item of a 400-page catalogue, it stirred up serious buyer interest selling for $92,000 against a pre-auction estimate of $75,000.

Julius Hogarth and Conrad Erichsen set up as jewellers in 1852 in a small shop at 394 George Street (near Liverpool Street). Relocating several times in the same street, their final location was 312 George Street on the south east corner of Hunter Street in what was formerly Skinners Hotel.

Hogarth is reputed to have designed and engraved the dies, while Erichsen is said to have actually made them. History records that Erichsen was quite a drinker and in the habit of striking a token whenever his thirst got the better of him!

Messrs Hogarth and Erichsen actively promoted the use of indigenous Australian flora and fauna elements and indigenous figures into their metal work and jewellery. They achieved great success during the 1850s notably through the vice-regal patronage of Governors Young and Denison.

Their works are today held in Canberra’s National Library of Australia and National Gallery of Australia. And Melbourne’s National Gallery of Victoria and Sydney’s Powerhouse Museum.

 


1926 Sydney Mint Sovereign FDC rev
COIN
1926 Sydney Mint Specimen Sovereign
QUALITY
FDC
PROVENANCE
A.H.F. Baldwin, Private Collection Melbourne
PRICE
$85,000
COMMENTS
The State Library of New South Wales, confirms through its archival documents the extreme rarity of this 1926 Specimen Sovereign. The Library also confirms the coin’s importance and ceremonious origins. The coin was struck on the 11 August 1926 - the very last day of operation of the Sydney Mint - in a ceremony attended by numismatic luminaries such as Mr A M Le Souef and Sir William Dixson.
SOLD
May 2017
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1926 Sydney Mint Sovereign FDC obv

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Struck to specimen quality, as a presentation piece, the coin is presented today as a superb FDC, brilliantly preserved and is one of three known.

An invoice made out to Sir William Dixson for the minting of coins on August 11, 1926 confirms that indeed fifty 1926 sovereigns were struck as circulating coins on the last day, destined for selected private collections and museums.

Included in the Library’s archives is a statement (signed by Sir William Dixson’s son, Robert) documenting the minting ceremony noting that “the last eight of the fifty sovereigns were struck individually”.

Using modern day terminology, the last eight were struck to specimen quality.

Dixon’s note further confirms that the last two out of the eight were sent to London.

We now know that they have been melted down.

The third and fourth last sovereigns were presented to Sir William Dixson and bequeathed to the State Library of New South Wales.

We also know that the Museum of Victoria received one perhaps two specimens, leaving two maybe three Specimen 1926 Sovereigns available to private collectors.

The Sydney Mint began receiving gold on May 14, 1855, and issued its first sovereigns soon after on June 23.

After seventy one years of operation, the mint was forced to close. Its operations had been unprofitable for some time the irony being that a mint could go broke making coins.

The official reports from the Mint Master of the Sydney Mint to the Royal Mint London in the era 1922 to 1926 clearly reveal a mint in decline; the limited mintages evidence of such.

Today these coins have become vibrant collector’s items. And while all four coins are high in demand, the stand-out year as far as collectors are concerned is the year 1926, which denotes the mint’s final year of coining.

This extremely rare 1926 Sydney Mint Specimen Sovereign is offered at $85,000 and in our view represents outstanding buying value.

Particularly when you consider that a 1926 Sovereign that was struck for circulation - and that showed slight wear to the high points - sold at auction in March 2016 for more than $50,000. A re-affirmation of the significance and importance of the date '1926'.


1823 Macintosh & Degraves obv
COIN
1823 Macintosh and Degraves Shilling
QUALITY
nearly Uncirculated
PROVENANCE
Guy Newton-Brown, Private Collection Sydney
PRICE
$ 95,000
COMMENTS
That historians have traced a business transaction involving the 1823 Macintosh & Degraves Kangaroo Shilling back to 1848 attests to the importance of this iconic piece of Australiana. The transaction was a purchase for the esteemed London National Collection. The Kangaroo Shilling has a remarkable history with a connection that lives on today to Tasmania's Cascade Brewery.
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1823 Macintosh and Degraves Rev

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This particular Macintosh and Degraves Shilling is the finest of 15 known examples. Excessively rare, consistently in demand, this piece stands shoulder to shoulder with some of Australia’s great coin rarities.

Formerly owned by Melbourne barrister Guy Newton-Brown it is sold with historical papers from Spink & Son London, 1968.

1823 Macintosh & Degraves documents

Fondly referred to as the ‘Smiling Rat’, the design was reputedly based on a drawing that was sent back to London in the late 1780s, said to be the first depiction of an Australian kangaroo.

It is our first Australian token and the only piece to be struck in this denomination.

When Hugh McIntosh and Peter Degraves organised the striking of this token for the Cascade Saw Mills in 1823, they could hardly have foreseen that it would one day become a prized collector piece. 

The token is remarkable for a number of reasons, all of which adds to its value today.

  • For a start, there’s that creature. Anyone who has taken even a passing interest in our colonial history would have seen it elsewhere: it’s reputedly based on a drawing that was sent back to London in the late 1780s, said to be the first depiction of an Australian kangaroo.
  • Then there’s the ‘Tasmania’ legend on the token. Until 1853 the island colony was known officially as Van Diemen’s Land, although Tasmania was used in print as early as 1824.
  • Messrs McIntosh and Degraves did not arrive in the colony until April 1824 – the year after the token’s ostensible date. What’s more, the Cascade Saw Mills for which it was struck didn’t commence operations until four months later.
  • It’s generally acknowledged that the Macintosh and Degraves token was struck in London in 1824 prior to their departure from England, most likely at the Soho Mint of Matthew Boulton fame. Furthermore, it is believed that it was never issued, the majority melted down following a well-documented custom’s seizure involving the partners’ cargo.

That we don’t know the full story has tantalised numismatists and historians for decades.

Does it really matter? Definitely not – after all, it simply adds to the magic. 


1861 Sydney Mint Sovereign
COIN
1861 Sydney Mint Sovereign
QUALITY
Choice Uncirculated
PROVENANCE
Private Collection Melbourne
PRICE
$ 18,500
COMMENTS
Most Aussie collectors start their gold sovereign collection with a Sydney Mint Sovereign. It's only natural given that they are the nation’s first sovereigns, struck between 1855 and 1870. But most collectors won’t be given the opportunity to start their collection at the premium quality level of this coin, Choice Uncirculated. This is a remarkable piece of Australian currency history, a genuine rarity at a truly affordable price.
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1861 Sydney Mint Sovereign

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It is hard to fathom how this particular 1861 Sydney Mint Sovereign came through the production process to become a prized collector piece. Brilliantly preserved, it must have been put aside soon after it was struck for the coin has immaculate edges and satin fields.

The coin features the Sydney Mint Type II design which depicts Queen Victoria with a sprig of banksia in her hair.

On the 9th August 1853 Queen Victoria approved an Order in Council prepared by the British Government to establish Australia’s very first mint at or near Sydney, in New South Wales.

Two years later the designs had been approved. Dies produced at the Royal Mint London, and dated 1855, were despatched to the Sydney Mint which had been established on the site of the old Rum Hospital in Macquarie Street. 

The mint began receiving gold on May 14, 1855, and issued its first sovereigns soon after on June 23.

Records indicate that 502,000 sovereigns were struck in the Sydney Mint’s first year of operation.

Though the reverse side featured a uniquely Australian design, with the words Australia and Sydney Mint featured boldly, the obverse side was similar to English coins with the plain, ribboned head of Queen Victoria. (Referred to as the Type 1 portrait design.) The reverse design has fascinated historians and collectors alike for decades. The coins were inscribed with the national name, Australia, even though the country was operating as separate colonies. Australia did not operate under a single government until Federation in 1901.

The Australian flavour of the nation’s gold coinage was strengthened in 1857 when the design was altered to incorporate a sprig of banksia in the Queen’s hair. (Referred to as the Type 2 portrait design.)

This touch of colonial pride seems to have gone unnoticed in London for a number of years until, in 1871, approval for the Sydney Mint design was abruptly revoked and Australian Sovereigns once again took on the traditional British flavour. Not only was the banksia removed from Queen Victoria’s hair, but two new reverse designs were also introduced – the traditional British St George and the Dragon, and a shield design, which ran in parallel. 


1855 Sovereign Unc Rev
COIN
1855 Sydney Mint Sovereign
QUALITY
Uncirculated
PROVENANCE
Private Collection NSW
PRICE
$95,000
COMMENTS
The 1855 Sydney Mint Sovereign is one of the prized rarities in the Sydney Mint Sovereign series and has pride of place in every Australian sovereign collection. The coin also has international standing. It is the nation’s first gold sovereign minted at the Sydney Mint - the nation’s very first mint – and brings to any collection a wonderful and everlasting history.
SOLD
MAY 2017
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1855 Sovereign Unc Obv

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But the 1855 Sydney Mint sovereign offers more than history. In the quality level offered here the coin also offers an extreme rarity.

You can count on the fingers of one hand the number of Uncirculated 1855 Sydney Mint Sovereigns that we have sold, a reflection of the coin’s extremely limited availability at this quality level. 

On the 9th August 1853 Queen Victoria approved an Order in Council prepared by the British Government to establish Australia’s very first mint at or near Sydney, in New South Wales. 

Although it was initially envisaged that the Sydney Mint would produce imperial design sovereigns, it was decided that, as the coins would be legal tender only in the colonies, a design specifically attributed to the Sydney Mint should be produced.

 

The full name of the mint, Sydney Mint, was incorporated into the legend: going against all known protocols at the time.

Furthermore the coins were inscribed with the national name, Australia, even though the country was at that stage operating as separate colonies. Australia did not operate under a single Government until Federation in 1901. 

The mint began receiving gold on May 14, 1855, and issued its first sovereigns soon after on June 23. 

 


1855 Sydney Mint Half Sovereign Rev
COIN
1855 Sydney Mint Half Sovereign
QUALITY
Extremely Fine
PROVENANCE
Private Collection Melbourne
PRICE
$95,000
COMMENTS
The 1855 Sydney Mint Half Sovereign has a unique status as Australia’s very first half sovereign - struck at the nation’s first mint, the Sydney Mint. The coin is amazingly rare. Less than fifty examples are known today and let’s be clear on this point. That’s not fifty at each quality level. That’s fifty across all quality levels. (To put this figure into perspective, the industry estimates that 1500 to 2000 1930 Pennies, across all quality levels, are known.)
SOLD
MAY 2017
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1855 Sydney Mint Half Sovereign Obv

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This coin is a superb example of Australia’s very first half sovereign with beautiful old gold tone, strong edges that have an almost ‘picture frame’ effect on the coin and minimal marks in the field.

This coin is ranked in the top five of the fifty known examples. 
The scarcity of the ‘1855’ simply is tied to its mintage. The year 1855 was the first year of  operation of the Sydney Mint and a minuscule number of half sovereigns were struck, 21,000

 

By comparison, the following year (1856) the mint struck 478,000 half sovereigns.

For the collector seeking to fill the hole in his Australian half sovereign collection. Or the investor seeking to acquire a great Australian rarity, this is an unparalleled opportunity.

 

 


1813 Dump Rev
COIN
1813 Colonial Dump
QUALITY
good Very Fine
PROVENANCE
A.H.F. Baldwin, Private Collection NSW
PRICE
$75,000
COMMENTS
The 1813 Dump and its partner, the Holey Dollar, were the first coins struck in Australia. Not only are they very rare, but their fascinating history has made them two of the world’s most famous coins. This 1813 Dump is a premium quality piece. Presented in a quality level of good Very Fine it is ranked in the top eight per cent of known surviving examples and is definitely one to tuck away for the future.
SOLD
APRIL 2017
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1813 Dump obv

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The investment value of this coin is preserved in its rarity and its quality. It also is preserved in its standing as the nation’s first silver coin.

And that’s not to overlook its revered provenance. The name A. H. F. Baldwin attached to this coin will have an everlasting influence on its future investment value.

When you look at the quality variance of a high quality good Very Fine Colonial Dump (such as the coin we are selling) and a well circulated example as below, the differences are vast.

1813 Dump Poor

1813 Colonial Dump... a well circulated example.

But the price differential is not so vast. 

Which is why we believe that high quality Dumps are underrated and undervalued. 

It is obvious when you look at the pie chart shown opposite, that finding a Colonial Dump in the lesser quality levels is a relatively easy task. The Dump with a value of fifteen pence circulated widely in the colony: the extreme wear on most Dumps evidence that they saw considerable use. 

What is also obvious from the chart is that securing a Colonial Dump in a quality level of good Very Fine or better is a far more difficult task. We would sight one good Very Fine Dump on the open market annually.

So while the Dump with a value of fifteen pence may seem to be the diminutive partner of the Holey Dollar with its Five Shillings value, the reality is that top quality Dumps are extremely rare and as such highly valued.

What sets this Good Very Fine Dump apart from the well circulated example is as follows:
•    The fleur de lis on the left hand side and the right hand side of the crown have definition and have not melded into the coin.
•    The pearls to the left and right of the Crown are well defined and again have not melded into the coin.
•    The legend New South Wales and the date 1813 are strong and well contained in the coin. 
•    Notice the oblique milling around the edge. Strong, well defined and fully evident. 
•    The reverse Fifteen Pence is three dimensional. The ‘H’ for Henshall also is defined.
•    While the Holey Dollar glaringly shows that it is one coin struck from another, in a less obvious way so too does the Dump. Notice the underlying design detail in the coin under the lettering Fifteen Pence. That’s the design from the center of the original Spanish Dollar from which this Dump was created. We refer to it as the undertype and its presence is highly prized.

This is without doubt an investment quality Colonial Dump offered at a value-plus price.

 


BB - 1 1930 Penny GVF rev 170216-194 - Copy
COIN
1930 Penny
QUALITY
Good Very Fine
PROVENANCE
Private Collection Melbourne
PRICE
$65,000
COMMENTS
The reality is the photographs - and the close up shot of the crown - will do most of the talking on this superb good Very Fine 1930 Penny. With a full central diamond and the smudging of the seventh and eighth pearl, this coin is four to five grades higher than those 1930 Pennies most frequently sighted. We rate this coin as being in the top 3 per cent. (See pie chart attached.) Already have a 1930 Penny? Then consider a trade and upgrade your coin.
SOLD
MAY 2017
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BB - 1A 1930 Penny GVF obv 170216-200

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BB - 1B 1930 Penny VF BAND 170216-200-3

This good Very Fine 1930 Penny has  

  1. A full central diamond that leaps out and knocks you in the eye. (With most 1930 Pennies, the central diamond is completely obliterated. Or just one side of the central diamond is evident, the other three sides worn away.)
  2. The 1930 Penny was originally struck with eight pearls. The ‘smudging’ of the seventh and eight pearl is evident in this coin and it is this area of the crown that makes this coin of the highest rarity.  
  3. There are six clear, crisp well defined pearls in the crown.
  4. The oval to the left of the central diamond is intact. (With most 1930 Pennies the oval is only partially evident.)
  5. The edges are undamaged. The fields are undamaged. The fields are glossy and smooth. The toning is an even chocolate brown.
  6. The reverse is particularly impressive with well-defined upper and lower scrolls and inner beading.

And while all of the above details may seem very technical … it is the complete and strong central diamond, the complete lower band and the ‘smudging’ of the seventh and eighth pearl that places this coin in a league of its own and justifies the supreme quality level of Good Very Fine.

This coin is easily in the top 3 per cent of known surviving examples. See pie chart below.

1930 Penny - Pie Chart

Our experiences attest to the scarcity of a 1930 Penny at this quality level. We have been involved in the industry for more than forty five years and this is the fourth only good Very Fine ‘1930’ that we have handled. 

The accidental minting of the 1930 Penny was not discovered until the 1940s. That the 1930 Penny underwent at least a decade of circulation before it was discovered means that most of the surviving examples are well circulated, with edge bumps and field marks. The pie chart below clearly shows the extreme scarcity of 1930 Pennies in a quality level of Good Very Fine or better.

Already have a 1930 Penny? Then consider a trade to upgrade your coin.


1923 Halfpenny about Extremely Fine
COIN
1923 Halfpenny
QUALITY
about Extremely Fine
PROVENANCE
Private Collection Melbourne
PRICE
$ 9,500
COMMENTS
The 1923 Halfpenny is the glamour coin of the Australian halfpenny series: the nation’s scarcest halfpenny. And this particular 1923 Halfpenny is a stand out piece. The coin is presented in a remarkable state of preservation with glossy, smooth surfaces and a hint of circulation. A full central diamond, six crisp pearls and the appearance of the seventh and eighth pearls.
SOLD
MAY 2017
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1923 Halfpenny about Extremely Fine o

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While this all sounds very technical, these attributes and in particular the solid presence of the seventh and eighth pearl in the band of the crown confirms that this is a premium quality 1923 Halfpenny.

For decades collectors have challenged the 1923 Halfpenny mintage recorded in the Sydney Mint Annual Report. The mintage was recorded as 1,113,600. Collectors cited the coin's incredible scarcity out in the market place relative to the recorded figure.

John Sharples, at the time Curator of Australia’s National Coin Archives set the record straight when he undertook an analysis of production at both the Sydney and Melbourne Mints. His research confirmed that the 1,113,600 halfpennies struck at the Sydney Mint were in fact dated 1922.

We now know that the 1923 Halfpenny was struck at the Melbourne Mint and in a mintage of approximately 15,000, confirming its status as Australia’s rarest circulating halfpenny.


1856 Sovereign date side replacement 160928-9907
COIN
1856 Sydney Mint Sovereign
QUALITY
Good Extremely Fine / About Uncirculated
PROVENANCE
Private Collection Sydney
PRICE
$ 45,000
COMMENTS
The 1856 Sydney Mint Sovereign is a great rarity. And it's a fact that in the upper quality levels it is as difficult - if not more difficult - to acquire than the 1855 Sovereign. And yet the mintages of both coins would suggest otherwise. (1855 – 502,000. 1856 – 981,000.) The industry has always acknowledged the scarcity of the 1856 Sovereign. Both the '55 and '56 sovereigns have shared the same catalogue value for decades, declaring them equally as important.
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1856 Sovereign non date side replacement 160928-9923

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A fascination with coins as a child, and a passion for colonial history as an adult, saw a Sydney resident pursue the Sydney Mint Sovereign series over a twenty year period.

His focus was on quality, but in the case of rare date sovereigns (such as the 1855 and 1856) he held a number of examples. This superb 1856 Sydney Mint Sovereign is one such coin from his collection.

Also available from the same collection:

  • 1856 Sydney Mint Sovereign Good Extremely Fine $22,000 (Photos are available on request)
  • 1856 Sydney Mint Sovereign Extremely Fine $16,000. (Photos are available on request)

On the 9th August 1853 Queen Victoria approved an Order in Council prepared by the British Government to establish Australia’s very first mint at or near Sydney, in New South Wales.

Two years later the designs had been approved. Dies produced at the Royal Mint London, and dated 1855, were despatched to the Sydney Mint which had been established on the site of the old Rum Hospital in Macquarie Street. 

The mint began receiving gold on May 14, 1855, and issued its first sovereigns soon after on June 23. Records indicate that 502,000 sovereigns were struck in the Sydney Mint’s first year of operation.

Though the reverse side featured a uniquely Australian design, with the words Australia and Sydney Mint featured boldly, the obverse side was similar to English coins with the plain, ribboned head of Queen Victoria. (Referred to as the Type 1 portrait design.)

The reverse design has fascinated historians and collectors alike for decades. The coins were inscribed with the national name, Australia, even though the country was operating as separate colonies. Australia did not operate under a single government until Federation in 1901.

The Australian flavour of the nation’s gold coinage was strengthened in 1857 when the design was altered to incorporate a sprig of banksia in the Queen’s hair. (Referred to as the Type 2 portrait design.)

This touch of colonial pride seems to have gone unnoticed in London for a number of years until, in 1871, approval for the Sydney Mint design was abruptly revoked and Australian Sovereigns once again took on the traditional British flavour.

Not only was the banksia removed from Queen Victoria’s hair, but two new reverse designs were also introduced – the traditional British St George and the Dragon, and a shield design, which ran in parallel. 


1808 Holey Dollar date side
COIN
1813 Holey Dollar struck on an 1808 Ferdinand VII Silver Dollar
QUALITY
Good Extremely Fine (Original Coin) Uncirculated (Counter-stamps)
PROVENANCE
A. H. Baldwin, Philip Spalding
PRICE
$450,000
COMMENTS
This Holey Dollar is unique. Of monumental historic significance with an impeccable and well documented provenance, this Holey Dollar is the ultimate combination of extreme rarity and extreme quality. Graded Good Extremely Fine with Uncirculated Counter Stamps, this coin is ranked in the top five of the 300 surviving examples.
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8237

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This Holey Dollar is unique. It is the only example of a Holey Dollar to bear the date 1808 and the portrait and legend of Ferdinand VII.

Spain was in turmoil in 1808.

On 19 March 1808 Charles IIII of Spain abdicated the throne for his son, Ferdinand VII. He reigned for only two months and on 6 May 1808, was tricked into exile by Napoleon Bonaparte, who proclaimed his brother Joseph Bonaparte as King of Spain.

On 12 August 1808, the Mexico Mint received the new dies bearing the legend and portrait of Ferdinand VII.

Refusing to acknowledge Bonaparte as King of Spain the mint commenced production of silver dollars featuring Ferdinand’s portrait and legend. Because the mint received the dies in the latter part of 1808, very few silver dollars were struck in that year depicting Ferdinand VII.

The very reason why this Holey Dollar is the only known example struck from an 1808 Ferdinand VII Silver Dollar.

Whilst today people take to the streets to demonstrate their political views, the Mexico Mint made its own (not so quiet) stand by retaining Ferdinand VII’s legend and portrait on the Spanish coinage even though Joseph Bonaparte had in 1808 been proclaimed King of Spain.

This coin is a tangible reminder of the social and political messages conveyed by currency.

Glorious quality with lustre

The original Spanish silver dollar from which this Holey Dollar was created is uniformly toned a beautiful gun metal blue grey.

The surfaces are reflective and glossy. Look closely and you see that the coin has original golden lustre in the legend and the date 1808. 

The original coin is graded Good Extremely Fine, making it one of the finest of the 300 known Holey Dollars, comparable quality-wise to the Madrid Holey Dollar which sold in 2015 for a world record price of $550,000.

To our knowledge this is the finest Ferdinand VII Holey Dollar available to private collectors.

It is beyond doubt the finest Ferdinand VII Holey Dollar that we have handled.

Uncirculated Counter Stamps

The counter stamps of this Holey Dollar are highlighted by original golden lustre and beautiful toning.

They are Uncirculated, as struck, and fully detailed as to the impression of the inner denticles, lettering Five Shillings and New South Wales, date 1813, fleur de lis, double twig of leaves and tiny H. The pristine state of the counter stamps is remarkable.

That after delivering this coin to the Deputy Commissary General’s Office in January 1814 along with 39,909 other Holey Dollars, it was never used.

And that after the Holey Dollar was officially demonitised in 1829 it survived the recall, and the eventual melting pot, is simply miraculous.

Well documented provenance

This coin has an impeccable provenance. In terms of Holey Dollars the name Spalding is in our view the ultimate.

This Holey Dollar was owned by A.H. Baldwin and was acquired by private treaty in 1968 by Philip Spalding.

The coin is photographed on page 192 of Spalding’s renowned book, The World of the Holey Dollar.

1808 Holey Dollar Counter Stamps
1813 Holey Dollar close up2

The rarest of the rare

There are approximately two hundred Holey Dollars held in private hands, each of which can be characterised into ‘types’ based on the monarch and the mint of the original silver dollar.

And this Holey Dollar is one of the rarest types.

Macquarie’s original order for 40,000 Spanish Dollars did not specify dates. Silver Dollars minted under Ferdinand VI, Charles III, Charles IIII and Ferdinand VII were all acceptable.

Nor did he care where they were minted, Mexico, Peru, Bolivia or Spain.

This Holey Dollar depicts the portrait and legend of Ferdinand VII. And the mintmark of the Mexico Mint.

  • The portrait and legend of Ferdinand VII appears on only 7 per cent of known Holey Dollars, the very reason why we say that while all Holey Dollars are rare, Ferdinand VII Holey Dollars are the rarest of the rare.
  • By comparison the portrait and legend of Charles III (Ferdinand VII’s grandfather) appears on 14 per cent of known Holey Dollars
  • And the portrait and legend of Charles IIII, (Ferdinand’s father) appears on 74 per cent of known Holey Dollars making it the most readily available type.

These three traits (the portrait of Ferdinand VII, the legend of Ferdinand VII and the mint) combine to make this Holey Dollar one of the rarest of all types. 

BOX SHOT - 1777 HD 170306-878

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


1919 Square Penny Type 3
COIN
1919 Square Penny Type 3
QUALITY
Choice Uncirculated
PROVENANCE
Private Collection Melbourne 1995
PRICE
$ 60,000
COMMENTS
The 1919 Type 3 Square Penny is a great rarity with perhaps fifteen examples available to collectors. To put that figure into perspective a buyer will wait at least twelve to eighteen months for an example to come onto the market. Acquired in 1995 by a Melbourne collector, this coin has been stored in a bank vault since the day it was bought and is superb for quality.
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1919 Square Penny Type 3

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The Type 3 is the most popular choice of collectors seeking a 1919 Square Penny. One of the prime reasons for its popularity is its unique design.

No other square penny in the series shares the style of kookaburra and the very modern, stylish lettering of ‘one penny’. And it’s the design difference that separates it from the rest.

Technical comments: Four different designs were tested in 1919 and they are referenced as the Type 3, 4, 5 and 6.

For more information on Australia’s Square Coinage 1919 – 1921 view our latest Catalogue.

Click here to view Catalogue

1920 Type 7 Square Penny Rev Edwards 161214-810
COIN
1920 Square Penny Type 7
QUALITY
Choice Uncirculated
PROVENANCE
Private Collection Melbourne 1995
PRICE
$ 75,000
COMMENTS
We are the only company to have handled all of the design types and the metals that make up the Square Penny series. And we have seen the full spectrum of qualities from the absolute best down to the very poorest. And this 1920 Type 7 Square Penny is amongst the very best. Acquired in 1995 by a Melbourne collector, the coin has been stored in a bank vault since the day it was bought.
SOLD
April 2017
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1920 Type 7 Square Penny Obv Edwards161214-819

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The Type 7 is a great rarity with perhaps twelve examples available to collectors. To put that figure into perspective a collector will wait at least one to two years for an example to come onto the market.

And if you are looking for a premium quality Type 7, such as this coin, then your wait will be even longer.

This coin is superb for quality, highly detailed and well struck and an exception to those most commonly found. It has proof like characteristics that are seldom if ever seen.

Technical comments: Five different designs were tested in 1920, only four of which are available to collectors. The fifth is housed in the Museum of Victoria. They are referenced as the Type 7, 8, 9 and 10 and the museum piece, the Type 13

For more information on Australia’s Square Coinage 1919 – 1921 view our latest Catalogue.

Click here to view Catalogue

1921 Square Penny Type 11
COIN
1921 Square Penny Type 11
QUALITY
Choice Uncirculated
PROVENANCE
Private Collection Melbourne 1995
PRICE
$ 50,000
COMMENTS
The 1921 Square Pennies are the most accessible - and affordable – coins in the entire Square Penny series. There is no suggestion here that the 1921 Square Pennies are available at the drop of a hat. Perhaps twenty Type 11 Square Pennies are known, which for the buyer translates into a waiting time of up to a year for an example to become available. (Compare that to the 1930 Penny where 1500 to 2000 are believed to exist.)
SOLD
June 2017
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1921 Square Penny Type 11

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Once collectors introduce quality into their selection process, acquiring a 1921 Square Penny becomes a task that will take several years.

We are the only company to have handled all of the design types and the metals that make up the Square Penny series. And we have seen the full spectrum of qualities from the absolute best down to the very poorest. And this 1921 Type 11 Square Penny is amongst the very best. Acquired in 1995 by a Melbourne collector, the coin has been stored in a bank vault since the day it was bought.

This is a superb Type 11 Square Penny with a deeply etched design of a thin kookaburra resting on a twig. The coin has stunning proof-like surfaces and magnificent tone.

Technical comments: Two different designs were tested in 1921 and they are referenced as the Type 11 and 12.

For more information on Australia’s Square Coinage 1919 – 1921 view our latest Catalogue.

Click here to view Catalogue

1927 Proof Penny
COIN
1927 Proof Penny
QUALITY
Superb FDC
PROVENANCE
Private Collection Melbourne
PRICE
$ 35,000
COMMENTS
This coin is of the highest rarity and for three very basic reasons. The first is the inclusion of the word ‘proof’ in its description which indicates that this coin was struck as a collector piece – and was not struck for circulation. The second is the date ‘1927’. In terms of proof pennies, ‘1927’ is the rare one. The third defining aspect of this coin is its quality. It is one of the very best with much original copper brilliance.
SOLD
APRIL 2017
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1927 Proof Penny

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This Proof Penny was especially struck in 1927 at the Melbourne Mint as a limited mintage collector piece and is one of perhaps four privately owned.

The quality of this particular proof penny is a further refinement on its rarity for we rate this coin highly. The coin retains its original copper brilliance (particularly on the reverse) which is very rarely seen in coins out of this era. It would be hard to improve upon its quality.

The striking of ‘collector’ coins - better known as proof coins - in Australia is not a modern day phenomenon. Nor a product of the decimal era.

The nation’s mints were striking proofs of our pre-decimal coinage in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the intention was then, as it is today, to create limited mintage collector coins struck to the highest quality standards. But with two very glaring differences. The mintages more than a century ago were minuscule. And their striking was sporadic.

The quality and the rarity of pre-decimal proof coins in today’s market is the very reason why they have become the choice of both collectors and investors.  


1937 Proof Crown
COIN
1937 Proof Crown
QUALITY
Superb FDC
PROVENANCE
Private Collection Melbourne
PRICE
$ 35,000
COMMENTS
Eighty years (1937 – 2017) have elapsed since the Melbourne Mint issued the 1937 Crown. While one million coins were released into circulation, only 100 coins were struck to proof quality as collector pieces to gift to dignitaries and sell to the collecting public. This coin is one of the finest examples out of the original mintage of 100 Proof Crowns, a superb FDC example with unblemished mirror fields contrasting a deeply etched design.
SOLD
April 2017
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1937 Proof Crown

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For the collector aspiring for quality, acquiring a Proof 1937 Crown can be a challenging task.

The release of the 1937 Proof Crown was a well-publicised event that saw the coins sell to members of the public outside traditional numismatic circles.

Coins being mishandled or pieces simply lost into circulation was the fate of many of the proofs out of the original mintage of 100.

Our experience attest to the difficulty in acquiring a premium Proof 1937 Crown. We reject two out of every three proof crowns on the basis of quality. ‘About FDC’ simply doesn’t cut it for us. It has to be FDC or nothing. We would be lucky to sight a superb 1937 Proof Crown on the market every one to two years.

When Edward VIII decided to abdicate the British throne in 1936, currency issues throughout the world were thrown into disarray. To distract from the chaos, the Australian Government issued the 1937 Crown - its first five-shilling piece - depicting the portrait of the new king George VI, Edward’s brother.

The notion of a Crown was pushed by the Treasurer of the day, R G Casey and is still to this day referred to as ‘Casey’s Cartwheel’.

No other coins were issued for circulation in 1937, bar the crown. So the 1937 Proof Crown was the only proof issue and feels the full force of collector attention.

This coin is the perfect combination of history, rarity and quality. 


1927 Proof Canberra Florin
COIN
1927 Proof Canberra Florin
QUALITY
FDC
PROVENANCE
Private Collection Melbourne
PRICE
$ 35,000
COMMENTS
The Duke of York officially opened Parliament House in Canberra on 9 May 1927. To cement the occasion into the nation’s psyche, the Government authorised the minting of the Canberra Florin featuring Parliament House on the reverse and George V on the obverse. While one million coins were struck for circulation, the Melbourne Mint issued 400 limited edition collector coins struck to proof quality. This coin is a superb example from the original mintage.
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1927 Proof Canberra Florin

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It was the Melbourne Mint’s very first collector coin issue, the coin selling for a sixpence premium over face value. And it was Australia’s very first commemorative coin.

The release of the 1927 Proof Canberra Florin was a well-publicised event that saw the coins sell to members of the public outside traditional numismatic circles.

Coins being mishandled or pieces simply lost into circulation was the fate of many of the proofs out of the original mintage of 400.

So a small mintage of coins becomes even smaller for the buyer seeking a quality Proof Canberra Florin.

In today’s market we might see one premium quality Proof Canberra Florin on the market every year.

This particular 1927 Proof Canberra Florin is a premium quality example and is classified as FDC, with brilliant mirror fields. The coin shows the characteristic striations associated with Proof Canberra Florins which reflects meticulous die preparation.  Moreover, it has been sharply struck and brilliantly preserved.  Visually it is stunning.

As an exquisite example of the Melbourne Mint's craftsmanship, the coin is a numismatic gem.


BB - 5 1937 Pattern Shilling Uniface rev 1842
COIN
1937 Proof Shilling Uniface
QUALITY
FDC
PROVENANCE
Sir Robert Johnson, A. H. Baldwin
PRICE
$ 155,000
COMMENTS
This 1937 Proof Shilling is a coin fit for royalty. Literally. It is unique in private hands. The only other known example was struck for George VI and is housed in the Royal Coin Collection housed at Windsor Castle. Only a person of influence would ever have had access to such a striking. No surprise therefore that the original owner was Sir Robert Johnson, Deputy Mint Master of the Royal Mint London.
SOLD
APRIL 2017
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BB - 5A 1937 Pattern Shilling Uniface obv 1870

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This 1937 Uniface Shilling was acquired by esteemed London dealers A H Baldwin following Johnson’s untimely death in 1938. 

  • Australian collectors were made aware of the coin’s existence in 1982 when it was offered at a public auction in Sydney. The coin sold for $4250.
  • It was again offered at auction in November 1994 and on an estimate of $15,000, fetched $23,000.
  • The coin’s importance and status as being the only example privately held saw it sell for $120,000 on an estimate of $80,000 in 2008.

From a technical perspective, this 1937 Shilling was struck to proof quality and is a uniface issue.

So where is the obverse portrait, you may well ask?

This coin was struck following the abdication of Edward VIII in 1936 and prior to the coronation of King George VI. The Commonwealth was simply “in between” monarchs.

So how is it different from the other 1937 shillings that also are listed as having no obverse portrait?

There are approximately seven other 1937 shillings known. They were struck depicting the reverse portrait of the merino’s head  and the obverse portrait of King Edward VIII.  When Edward abdicated the throne, the obverse portrait was removed by being tooled off.

King George V died on 20th January 1936 and his son, King Edward VIII, ascended the throne. The Australian Labor Government, under  Prime Minister Joseph Lyons, had planned to introduce new reverse designs to coincide with the new obverse designs of the changing monarch.

The new designs were a radical departure from the traditional ‘British designs’ adopted after Federation and were prepared with a strong focus on Australia’s national identity.

As the Royal Mint London still prepared the master dies for the Melbourne Mint, the mint struck test pieces for the Australian Government of the revised obverse and reverse designs but only of the florin, shilling, threepence and penny.

The Government’s plans were thrown into disarray when Edward abdicated the throne on 11 December 1936 so that he could marry American divorcee Wallis Simpson. 


Complete Collection 1957 – 1963 Perth Mint Copper Proofs
COIN
Complete Collection 1957 – 1963 Perth Mint Copper Proofs
QUALITY
FDC
PROVENANCE
Private Collection Perth
PRICE
Available individually - Read More
COMMENTS
The Perth proofs come high on our list of recommendations to clients. So high that when Melbourne journalist Anthony Black asked Coinworks to list ten coin rarities that were priced below $ 10,000 - and were destined for growth – the Perth Mint proofs struck between 1957 and 1963 were at the very top of our list. Available individually. The option is yours to select.
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  • 1957 Perth Proof Penny (two are available) -  $3500 . SOLD
  • 1958 Perth Proof Penny -  $3500 . SOLD
  • 1959 Perth Proof Penny -  $3500 . SOLD
  • 1960 Perth Proof Penny and Halfpenny FDC -  $4950 . SOLD .
  • 1961 Perth Proof Penny and Halfpenny FDC -  $4950 .
  • 1962 Perth Proof Penny and Halfpenny FDC -  $4950 .
  • 1963 Perth Proof Penny and Halfpenny FDC -  $4950 .

These are limited edition collector coins: a popular choice amongst our clients, in particular those that want to tuck something truly special away for children or grandchildren.

The key to their success is their rarity. And the extreme rarity of top quality pieces.

  • The mintages of the 1957, 1958 and 1959 Perth Pennies are 1112, 1028 and 1030 respectively which are indeed tiny mintages.
  • The mintages of the 1960, 1961, 1962 and 1963 Perth Penny and Halfpenny pairs are 1030, 1040, 1064 and 1100 respectively which again are indeed tiny mintages.
  • At least seven out of every ten Perth proofs that we sight are assessed by us as being inferior for quality, mishandled, toned and harshly spotted thereby reducing the pool of quality examples to a truly minuscule number.

It has to be said that the task of putting this collection together to such a consistently high standard would normally take years. Available individually. The option is yours to select.


1855 Sydney Mint Sovereign obv Extra Fine 161205-416
COIN
1855 Sydney Mint Sovereign
QUALITY
Extremely Fine
PROVENANCE
Private Collection Victoria
PRICE
$ 19,500
COMMENTS
The 1855 Sydney Mint Sovereign is the one coin that has pride of place in every sovereign collection. As Australia’s first gold sovereign minted at the Sydney Mint - the nation’s very first mint - it brings to any collection a wonderful and everlasting history. But the 1855 Sydney Mint sovereign offers more than history. In the quality level offered here it also is extremely rare.
SOLD
APRIL 2017
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1855 Sydney Mint Sovereign rev Extra Fine 161205-428

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Every circulated coin has a grading level at which serious rarity kicks in and for us that’s the point at which a collectible becomes an investment piece. The point at which rarity kicks in for the 1855 Sydney Mint Sovereign is Extremely Fine or higher.

To highlight the extreme scarcity of quality ’55 Sovereigns we make the point that the 1855 Sydney Mint Sovereign in the upper quality levels (Extremely Fine and above) is about four times as scarce as the 1852 Adelaide Pound in a comparable quality level.

And it’s a fair comparison, the 1855 Sovereign is the nation’s first gold sovereign officially sanctioned by the British Government, the 1852 Adelaide Pound is the nation’s first gold coin struck as an interim measure to resolve a currency crisis in South Australia.

And yet the price levels are comparable. That’s an anomaly that has to be addressed and in our view, coins such as this 1855 Sydney Mint Sovereign have the potential to double in price.

At Coinworks we have a very deep respect for history and this is clearly evident in the style of coins that we offer. Highly historical coins have a relevance beyond the industry. They are pieces that appeal to the widest possible buying audience which is why at Coinworks, they are always our preference. And it is history that underpins demand and fosters price growth.

The 1855 Sydney Mint Sovereign is history that you can hold in your hand. It is history that can be passed to the next generation. Its status as Australia’s first sovereign ensures that it will never be forgotten. As time passes, its historical value can only increase. 


Ann Mash Promissory Note Circa 1812
Notes
NOTE
Ann Mash Promissory Note Circa 1812
QUALITY
Very Fine
PROVENANCE
Bill Wright Collection
PRICE
$ 25,000
COMMENTS
This great historical piece, issued circa 1812, is unique. It is the only known surviving promissory note issued by a woman, Ann Mash, and the only promissory note issued in this denomination. Testimony to the importance of the Mash promissory notes, an example is held in the Sir John Ferguson Collection, National Library of Australia Canberra
SOLD
June 2017
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Convict Ann Mash is an inspiration to today’s female entrepreneurs who strive to succeed in the business community while juggling serious family commitments.

Ann Mash was a convict, and at the age of 31 was sentenced in 1789 to seven years in the penal colony of New South Wales. A multi-tasker, she was a wife three times-over and gave birth to thirteen children.

She also showed huge entrepreneurial and business skills. Ann was literate and articulate and amongst other business enterprises became involved in a bakery, a butcher, a general store and a small goods and passenger boat service from Parramatta to Sydney. She also held a wine and spirit licence for the King’s Head Tavern. Her well-written signature exists on documents with the early Bank of New South Wales, which started trading in 1817.

This great historical piece, issued circa 1812, is unique. It is the only known surviving promissory note issued by a woman, Ann Mash. Furthermore it is the only known promissory note issued in this denomination.

The Ann Mash Promissory Note is listed in the ‘Confirmed Private Note Issuers’ listing found in Dr W. J. D. Mira’s publication, ‘Coinage & Currency in NSW 1788-1829’. 


Ten Pound Note
Notes
NOTE
1888 London Chartered Bank of Australia Ten Pounds
QUALITY
Uncirculated
PROVENANCE
Archives of Note Printers Bradbury Wilkinson
PRICE
$ 9,750
COMMENTS
This 1888 London Chartered Bank of Australia Ten Pounds presents a financial snapshot of the colony exactly 100 years after settlement. It also is a high value note. And rare as such. A Ten Pounds note was well beyond the reach of most of the colony’s residents. In 1888, a farm hand in the colony was earning 13/- per week. This colonial Ten Pounds would have represented nearly four months wages.
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That it survives today retaining its original characteristics, crisp paper and vibrant colour unaffected by the passing of time is nothing short of a miracle.

Australia’s paper currency took on a sophisticated elegance with the establishment in 1817 of the Bank of New South Wales, the nation’s first private bank. And the issue of the bank’s circulating paper notes. The crude handwritten promissory notes that had proliferated throughout the colony soon after settlement forming an ad hoc unofficial paper currency had all but disappeared.

The private banking system flourished in Australia after the establishment of the Bank of New South Wales. By 1841 another 23 banks had been formed, including branches of some London banks. From the 1850s gold rush to 1888, a further 32 banks had opened their doors.

The London Chartered Bank was formed in London in 1852 and one year later established branches in both Melbourne and Sydney. In 1882, the bank opened a Brisbane branch.

During the financial crisis of 1893 this revered establishment was forced to suspend its payments but only for four months, later re-opening its doors.

The London Chartered Bank of Australia lives on through its subsequent mergers.  In 1921 the bank merged with the English, Scottish and Australian Bank (ES&A) which in turn amalgamated with the ANZ in 1970.

The specimen banknotes of our Colonial Banks have been attracting solid attention over the last few years.  The reasons are clear. The notes offer genuine quality. They offer scarcity. They have a glorious, rich history. And they are being offered at a price that makes them very affordable.


Circa 1900, Bank of Victoria Ltd Five Pounds Specimen
NOTE
Circa 1900, Bank of Victoria Ltd Five Pounds
QUALITY
Uncirculated
PROVENANCE
Archives of note printers Bradbury Wilkinson
PRICE
$ 7,950
COMMENTS
The Bank of Victoria was founded by Dr Thomas Black, a physician from the Richmond area of Melbourne. The bank was registered in Victoria in 1852 and commenced operations in January 1853 as the Bank of Victoria Limited. By 1887 the bank had 65 branches, all in Victoria. The Bank of Victoria amalgamated with the Commercial Banking Company of Sydney Limited in 1927 and eventually became part of the National Bank of Australia in 1981. Archived for more than a century by London engravers and printers Bradbury & Wilkinson, this high denomination colonial note retains its original characteristics and colour unaffected by the passing of time.
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Circa 1900, Bank of Victoria Ltd Five Pounds Specimen

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1887 London Chartered Bank of Australia One Pounds
NOTE
1887 London Chartered Bank of Australia one Pounds specimen
QUALITY
Uncirculated
PROVENANCE
Archives of note printers Bradbury Wilkinson
PRICE
$ 7,950
COMMENTS
The London Chartered Bank was formed in London in 1852 and one year later established branches in both Melbourne and Sydney. In 1882, the bank opened a Brisbane branch. During the financial crisis of 1893 this revered establishment was forced to suspend its payments but only for four months, later re-opening its doors. The London Chartered Bank of Australia lives on through its subsequent mergers. In 1921 the bank merged with the English, Scottish and Australian Bank (ES&A) which in turn amalgamated with the ANZ in 1970. The note has an original crispness in its paper and vibrant colours that defies time.
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1887 London Chartered Bank of Australia One Pounds

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Circa 1924 Twenty Pound
NOTE
Circa 1924 Twenty Pounds
QUALITY
Specimen
PROVENANCE
Private Collection Sydney
PRICE
$ 325,000
COMMENTS
An opportunity to acquire a piece of Australia’s banknote history that is as rare as it is significant. Discovered in London in a deceased estate, contained in an envelope dated 1924, and the only known example. It is noted that the Reserve Bank of Australia does not hold an example in its Currency Museum.
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It is pieces of the calibre of this banknote that has cemented Coinworks reputation for handling the most significant Australian currency rarities.

Australia’s Commonwealth of Australia banknotes were introduced in 1913 with the high denomination notes of the £20, £50 and £100 issued in 1914. An interesting point on our first banknotes that the designs did not include the monarch.

In the 1920s the Commonwealth of Australia’s banknotes underwent major design changes, the most significant of which was the inclusion of the monarch on the front of the note. The size of the notes also was significantly reduced.

The newly designed Ten Shillings and Pound notes were first issued in 1923. The five pounds in 1924, followed by the Ten Pounds in 1925.

The high denomination notes of £20, £50 and £100 were never re-issued, the one design remained during their lifetime.

We do however know that there were plans to revise the designs of the high denomination notes as evidenced by this specimen.

This note is unique. It was discovered in London via a deceased estate, contained in an envelope dated February 1924.

The front features the Coat of Arms and at the right a profile of King George V, akin to that used on Australia’s sovereign coinage. A prominent ‘20’ lies at each corner. The under-print contains a large TWENTY in the centre of the design.

The back of the note re-produces the Bruny Island timber-cutting scene used on the first and only £20 Commonwealth note issue.

The note has been securely housed in an envelope for more than ninety years which has ensured that no discoloration has occurred. It is as printed. For the record, one slight (and very minor) margin tear is noted.

This is an opportunity to acquire a piece of Australia’s banknote history that is as rare as it is significant.


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PO Box 1060 Hawksburn Victoria Australia 3142

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