• 1957 - 63 Perth Proofs FDC Group Shot
    
    			
    Coin
    Complete Collection 1957 – 1963 Perth Mint Copper Proofs
    Quality
    FDC
    Provenance
    Private Collection Perth
    Price
    $ 32,000 (12 coins)
    comments
    Our trip to Perth for the February Money Expo yielded several surprises including this collection of original blazing orange Perth Mint copper proofs. Twelve coins, brilliantly preserved and perfectly matched, presented to a consistently high standard. The Perth proofs come high on our list of purchase recommendations to clients. So high that when Melbourne journalist Anthony Black asked Coinworks to list ten coin rarities that were priced below $ 10,000 - and were destined for growth – the Perth Mint proofs struck between 1957 and 1963 were at the very top of our list. Available individually. Or as a total collection. The option is yours to select.
    • 1957 Perth Proof Penny (two are available) - $3500
    • 1958 Perth Proof Penny - $3500.
    • 1959 Perth Proof Penny - $3500.
    • 1960 Perth Proof Penny and Halfpenny FDC - $4950.
    • 1961 Perth Proof Penny and Halfpenny FDC - $4950.
    • 1962 Perth Proof Penny and Halfpenny FDC - $4950.
    • 1963 Perth Proof Penny and Halfpenny FDC - $4950.

    These are limited edition collector coins: a popular choice amongst our clients, in particular those that want to tuck something special away for the future for children or grandchildren.

    The key to their success is their rarity. And the extreme rarity of top quality pieces.

    • The mintages of the 1957, 1958 and 1959 Perth Pennies are 1112, 1028 and 1030 respectively which are indeed tiny mintages.
    • The mintages of the 1960, 1961, 1962 and 1963 Perth Penny and Halfpenny pairs are 1030, 1040, 1064 and 1100 respectively which again are indeed tiny mintages.
    • At least seven out of every ten Perth proofs that we sight are assessed by us as being inferior for quality, mishandled, toned and harshly spotted thereby reducing the pool of quality examples to a truly minuscule number.

    It has to be said that the task of putting this collection together to such a consistently high standard would normally take years. Available individually. Or as a total collection. The option is yours to select.

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  • 1921 Square Penny
    1921 Square Penny
    
    			
    Coin
    1921 Square Penny
    Quality
    Uncirculated
    Provenance
    Private Collection Victoria
    Price
    $ 49,000
    comments
    This coin caught the attention of Channel Seven in the lead up to the recent Perth Money Expo. It is a 1921 Square Penny and as you would expect with a coin that was going to be shown on national television, we selected one of the very best for quality. And one of the rarest. The coin is now available for private sale.

    In 1919, the Labor Government proposed a currency change to incorporate Australia’s native bird - the kookaburra - into the nation’s coinage. The Government wanted to break away from British designs and introduce a uniquely Australian style into our currency.

    The mooted change was politically motivated. A wave of nationalism was sweeping the country post World War I and the Government saw advantage in tapping into the mood of the nation.  A laughing kookaburra design and the depiction of the monarch without a crown were two of the elements of the new coinage that while highly contentious and provocative, the Government believed would now be accepted.

    Tests commenced at the Melbourne Mint in 1919 and continued until 1921 with the test pieces ultimately passed to dignitaries and Government officials to assess their reaction. History indicates that over the three year period 200 pieces, of various designs, were produced.

    Public reaction to the introduction of the square coinage was poor. There was widespread public resistance to change, while the elderly rejected the small size of the coins. However, the final decision not to proceed seems to have been based mainly on another consideration – the large number of vending machines then in operation requiring a circular coin.

    The impetus for change was further eroded when William Watt, the most influential advocate of the nickel kookaburras, suddenly resigned his position as Treasurer before the necessary regulations were in place.

    The kookaburra coins never went into production and Australia lost a great opportunity to go its own way. But with only the 200 prototypes to show as evidence of the Government’s grand scheme, Australian coinage gained another wonderful coin rarity.

    Irrespective of the year or the design, all Square Pennies are rare. Some designs are however far rarer than others … and this 1921 Square Penny is noted for its extreme rarity. In a career that spans more than forty years we have bought and sold perhaps six such 1921 Square Pennies. We refer to it as the Renniks Type 11.

    This Square Penny also is superb for quality with perfect edges (most unusual for a test piece), satin fields and a deeply etched design of a kookaburra resting on a twig.

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  • 1887 Melbourne Mint Sovereign
    1887 Melbourne Mint Sovereign
    
    			
    Coin
    1887 Melbourne Mint Sovereign
    Quality
    Brilliant Uncirculated
    Provenance
    Private Collection Melbourne
    Price
    $ 25,000
    comments
    No one could have envisaged in 1887 when the mint master authorized the striking of the Queen Victoria Young Head Shield Sovereign that the coin would one day become a world class rarity. Nor can we imagine how this particular 1887 Sovereign, struck in the factory conditions of the Melbourne Mint, came through the production process to become a prized collector piece. Brilliantly preserved, it must have been put aside soon after it was struck.

    We note the appearance of the ‘kiss-curl’ in Queen Victoria’s hair in front of her ear in this coin … the tell-tale sign of a premium quality Young Head Sovereign.

    Perhaps the person involved was aware that the Young Head design was being superseded and replaced with the Jubilee design, making this coin even more special as the very last year of its design.

    (The Young Head design ran from 1871 to 1887. The Jubilee design ran from 1887 to 1893, the cross over year being 1887.)

    The 1887 Sovereign is a prized rarity in the Queen Victoria Young Head Shield Sovereign series.

    Out of the seventeen years that this design ran there are only three key dates: the 1880 Sovereign struck at the Sydney Mint. And the 1886 Sovereign and 1887 Sovereign (this coin) struck at the Melbourne Mint.

    These coins are scarce in any quality. In Brilliant Uncirculated they are world class rarities with an appearance on the market that is not counted in months … but appearances every decade.

    This 1887 Melbourne Mint Sovereign is a remarkable piece of Australia’s currency history and a genuine rarity at a truly affordable price.   

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  • 1855 Sydney Mint Sovereign rev Extra Fine 161205-428
    1855 Sydney Mint Sovereign obv Extra Fine 161205-416
    
    			
    Coin
    1855 Sydney Mint Sovereign
    Quality
    Extremely Fine
    Provenance
    Private Collection Victoria
    Price
    $ 19,500
    comments
    The 1855 Sydney Mint Sovereign is the one coin that has pride of place in every sovereign collection. As Australia’s first gold sovereign minted at the Sydney Mint - the nation’s very first mint - it brings to any collection a wonderful and everlasting history. But the 1855 Sydney Mint sovereign offers more than history. In the quality level offered here it also is extremely rare.

    Every circulated coin has a grading level at which serious rarity kicks in and for us that’s the point at which a collectible becomes an investment piece. The point at which rarity kicks in for the 1855 Sydney Mint Sovereign is Extremely Fine or higher.

    To highlight the extreme scarcity of quality ’55 Sovereigns we make the point that the 1855 Sydney Mint Sovereign in the upper quality levels (Extremely Fine and above) is about four times as scarce as the 1852 Adelaide Pound in a comparable quality level.

    And it’s a fair comparison, the 1855 Sovereign is the nation’s first gold sovereign officially sanctioned by the British Government, the 1852 Adelaide Pound is the nation’s first gold coin struck as an interim measure to resolve a currency crisis in South Australia.

    And yet the price levels are comparable. That’s an anomaly that has to be addressed and in our view, coins such as this 1855 Sydney Mint Sovereign have the potential to double in price.

    At Coinworks we have a very deep respect for history and this is clearly evident in the style of coins that we offer. Highly historical coins have a relevance beyond the industry. They are pieces that appeal to the widest possible buying audience which is why at Coinworks, they are always our preference. And it is history that underpins demand and fosters price growth.

    The 1855 Sydney Mint Sovereign is history that you can hold in your hand. It is history that can be passed to the next generation. Its status as Australia’s first sovereign ensures that it will never be forgotten. As time passes, its historical value can only increase. 

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  • 1937 Proof Crown
    1937 Proof Crown
    
    			
    Coin
    1937 Proof Crown
    Quality
    Superb FDC
    Provenance
    Private Collection Melbourne
    Price
    $ 35,000
    comments
    Eighty years have elapsed since the Melbourne Mint issued the 1937 Crown. While one million coins were released into circulation, only 100 coins were struck to proof quality as presentation pieces to gift to dignitaries and VIPs and sell to the collecting public. This coin is one of the finest examples out of the original mintage of 100 Proof Crowns.

    For the collector aspiring for quality we make the following comments about the Proof 1937 Crown. Quality is indeed an issue.

    We reject two out of every three proof crowns on the basis of quality. ‘About FDC’ simply doesn’t cut it for us. It has to be FDC or nothing. And in the case of this coin the buyer is looking at a superb FDC example with unblemished mirror fields contrasting a deeply etched design.

    The relatively high incidence of poor quality Proof 1937 Crowns simply relates to the substantial size of the coin.  That and the fact that many of them went into non-collectors hands.

    We would be lucky to sight a superb 1937 Proof Crown on the market every one to two years.

    When Edward VIII decided to abdicate the British throne in 1936, currency issues throughout the world were thrown into disarray. To distract from the chaos, the Australian Government issued the 1937 Crown, its first five-shilling piece, depicting the portrait of the new king George VI, Edward’s brother.

    The notion of a Crown was pushed by the Treasurer of the day, R G Casey and is still to this day referred to as ‘Casey’s Cartwheel’.

    No other coins were issued for circulation in 1937, bar the crown. So the 1937 Proof Crown was the only proof issue and feels the full force of collector attention.

    This coin is the perfect combination of history, rarity and quality.

     

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  • 1930 Penny VF obv - Shume 161118-345
    1930 Penny VF rev - Shume 161118-336
    
    			
    Coin
    1930 Penny
    Quality
    Very Fine
    Provenance
    Private Collection Melbourne
    Price
    $ 52,500
    comments
    This is a ‘top’ quality 1930 Penny, in the upper 5 per cent of known surviving examples. To put this into perspective, this coin is classified four grades higher than the average 1930 Penny which is graded at ‘Fine’. With attributes that are clearly visible to the naked eye, this 1930 Penny is all class, and, at a quality level of Very Fine it also is a great rarity.

    As you would expect with a coin that is graded Very Fine, it has a complete central diamond that stands out and fairly smacks you in the eye. And this is an important point for us. We are quite adamant that for a 1930 Penny to be classified as Very Fine, the central diamond in the King’s crown on the obverse has to be complete and prominent.

    And it is this obsession with technicalities that ultimately guarantees our quality and protects our clients.

    Furthermore,

    • The coin has six strong pearls in the crown on the obverse.
    • The upper and lower scrolls on the reverse are strong.
    • The circular beading on the reverse also is crisp and well defined.
    • Even toning and smooth fields add further to its appeal.

    1930 Penny Crown up close

    And web watchers will note the infrequent appearances on the Coinworks website of 1930 Pennies at this high quality level: a reflection of the scarcity of premium quality examples.

    The pride in owning a 1930 Penny at this quality level is immeasurable.

    The coin is a national icon and its star status has made it one of Australia’s most valuable coins. What’s most interesting is that the 1930 Penny stumbled into fame.

    Officially the 1930 Penny was never struck and a review of minting records at the Melbourne Mint confirms that no pennies were struck for circulation in that year. The mint does however have a record of the six Proof 1930 Pennies that were struck as museum pieces.

    The suspected mintage of the 1930 Penny is 1500 to 2000.

    The 1930 Penny is still to this day the glamour coin of the numismatics industry and is unrivalled for popularity, enjoying a constant stream of demand unmatched by any other numismatic rarity.

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  • 1930 Penny gf
    1930 Penny gf date side
    
    			
    Coin
    1930 Penny
    Quality
    Good Fine
    Provenance
    Private Collection Melbourne
    Price
    $ 29,500
    comments
    The 1930 Penny is the coin that most Australian coin collectors want to have in their collection. It’s also the coin that most coin collectors boast about owning. And this particular 1930 Penny is a beauty. Yes it has circulated, but the rigours of circulation have treated the coin kindly. The obverse is graded good Fine and shows six pearls and a partial central diamond. The lower scroll is strong, the upper scroll also is strong. The inner beading is crisp. The edges are nice. The coin is evenly toned and has minimal marks in the field and is extremely attractive to look at even though it has circulated. It is a coin that you would be proud to show your family and friends.

    The 1930 Penny is a national icon and its star status has made it one of Australia’s most valuable coins. What’s most interesting is that the 1930 Penny stumbled into fame.

    Officially the 1930 Penny was never struck and a review of minting records at the Melbourne Mint confirms that no pennies were struck for circulation in that year. The mint does however have a record of the six Proof 1930 Pennies that were struck as museum pieces.

    The suspected mintage of the 1930 Penny is 1500 to 2000.

    The 1930 Penny is still to this day the glamour coin of the numismatics industry and is unrivalled for popularity, enjoying a constant stream of demand unmatched by any other numismatic rarity.

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  • 1808 Holey Dollar
    1808 Holey Dollar date side
    
    			
    Coin
    1813 Holey Dollar
    Quality
    Good Extremely Fine C/S - Uncirculated
    Provenance
    A. H. Baldwin
    Price
    $ 450,000
    comments
    The history associated with this Holey Dollar is momentous and is a reminder of the social and political messages conveyed by currency. Whilst today people take to the streets to demonstrate their political views, the Mexico Mint made its own (not so quiet) stand by refusing to acknowledge Joseph Bonaparte as King of Spain and retaining Ferdinand VII’s legend and portrait on the Spanish coinage. Struck from a Spanish Silver Dollar that was minted in 1808, this particular Ferdinand Holey Dollar is unique for the date and to our knowledge is the finest Ferdinand VII Holey Dollar available to private collectors. It is beyond doubt the finest Ferdinand VII Holey Dollar that we have handled.

    1808 AND UNIQUE

    The history associated with this Holey Dollar is momentous.

    The coin is unique and is the only example of a Holey Dollar to bear the date 1808 and the portrait and legend of Ferdinand VII.

    Spain was in turmoil in 1808. On 19 March 1808 Charles IIII of Spain abdicated the throne for his son, Ferdinand VII. He reigned for only two months and on 6 May 1808, was tricked into exile by Napoleon Bonaparte, who proclaimed his brother Joseph Bonaparte as King of Spain.

    On 12 August 1808, the Mexico Mint received the new dies bearing the legend and portrait of Ferdinand VII.

    Refusing to acknowledge Bonaparte as King of Spain they commenced production of silver dollars featuring Ferdinand’s portrait and legend. Because the mint received the dies in the latter part of 1808, very few silver dollars were struck depicting Ferdinand VII.

    Whilst today people take to the streets to demonstrate their political views, the Mexico Mint made its own (not so quiet) stand by retaining Ferdinand VII’s legend and portrait on the Spanish coinage even though Joseph Bonaparte had been proclaimed King of Spain in 1808. This coin is a reminder of the social and political messages conveyed by currency.

    THE RAREST OF THE RARE

    There are approximately two hundred Holey Dollars held in private hands, each of which can be characterised into ‘types’ based on the monarch and the mint of the original silver dollar.

    This Holey Dollar depicts the portrait and legend of Ferdinand VII. And the mintmark of the Mexico Mint. These three traits (the portrait of Ferdinand VII, the legend of Ferdinand VII and the mint) combine to make it one of the rarest of all types.

    • The portrait and legend of Ferdinand VII appears on only 7 per cent of known Holey Dollars, the very reason why we say that while all Holey Dollars are rare, Ferdinand VII Holey Dollars are the rarest of the rare.
    • By comparison the portrait and legend of Charles III (Ferdinand VII’s grandfather) appears on 14 per cent of known Holey Dollars
    • And the portrait and legend of Charles IIII, (Ferdinand’s father) appears on 74 per cent of known Holey Dollars making it the most readily available type.

    GLORIOUS QUALITY WITH LUSTRE

    The original Spanish silver dollar from which this Holey Dollar was created is uniformly toned a beautiful gun metal blue grey. The surfaces are reflective and glossy. Look closely and you see that the coin has original golden lustre in the legend and the date 1808.

    The original coin is graded Good Extremely Fine, making it one of the finest of the 300 known Holey Dollars, comparable quality-wise to the Madrid Holey Dollar which sold last year for a world record price of $550,000.

    To our knowledge this is the finest Ferdinand VII Holey Dollar available to private collectors. It is beyond doubt the finest Ferdinand VII Holey Dollar that we have handled.

    UNCIRCULATED COUNTER STAMPS

    The counter stamps of this Holey Dollar are highlighted by original golden lustre and beautiful toning. They are Uncirculated, as struck, and fully detailed as to the impression of the inner denticles, lettering Five Shillings and New South Wales, date 1813, fleur de lis, double twig of leaves and tiny H. The pristine state of the counter stamps is remarkable.

    That after delivering this coin to the Deputy Commissary General’s Office in January 1814 along with 39,909 other Holey Dollars, it was never used. And that after the Holey Dollar was officially demonitised in 1829 it survived the recall, and the eventual melting pot, is simply miraculous.

    IMPECCABLE PROVENANCE

    This coin has an impeccable provenance. In terms of Holey Dollars the name Spalding is in my view the ultimate. This Holey Dollar was owned by A.H. Baldwin then sold in 1968 to Phillip Spalding.

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  • 1920 Type 7 Square Penny Obv Edwards161214-819
    1920 Type 7 Square Penny rev 150810 horiz-2428
    
    			
    Coin
    1920 Type 7 Square Penny
    Quality
    Choice Uncirculated with proof-like surfaces
    Provenance
    Private Collection Melbourne
    Price
    $ 75,000
    comments
    When did you last see a Choice Uncirculated 1920 Square Penny? In my memory … never. This 1920 Type 7 Square Penny is graded at Choice Uncirculated and is one of the absolute finest that we have seen and handled. In an article soon to be released we state that there are perhaps fifteen 1920 Square Pennies of this design type available to collectors. And it is the quality and rarity edge - and the price edge – of this iconic rarity that makes it seriously attractive buying.

    This 1920 Square Penny is highly detailed, well struck and has been brilliantly preserved, held in the one collection since 1995. And doesn’t it show? The coin has superb quality characteristics, proof-like surfaces.

    The coin was struck at the Melbourne Mint and is evidence of the Labor Government’s grand plan in the 1920s to overhaul the nation’s coinage, and break away from British designs by introducing a uniquely Australian Penny and Halfpenny. Some say it was the rumblings of a Republican movement way ahead of its time.

    The mood of the nation had changed after World War I. A laughing kookaburra design and the depiction of the monarch without a crown were two of the elements of the new coinage that while highly contentious and provocative, the Government hoped would be accepted, caught up in the wave of nationalism that was sweeping the nation post World War I.

    Trials of the intended square coinage began at the Melbourne Mint in 1919 and continued for a further two years. Four different coin designs were tested in 1919 and we refer to them as the Type 3, 4, 5 and 6. Five were tested in 1920 and they are referred to as the Type 7, 8, 9, 10 and 13. Only two designs were tested in 1921 and we refer to them as the Type 11 and Type 12.

    The test pieces were given to dignitaries and Government officials to assess reaction … the very reason why so many Square Pennies today show signs of mishandling. And exemplary examples such as this coin are seldom seen. In fact we ask the question … “When did you last see a Square Penny ascribed a quality level of Choice Uncirculated?”

    The swell of popularity for the Square Penny began in the 1950s and the demand for the coin continues to this very day.

    Shape, innovative metal, history, rarity and growth … all factors that have combined to make the Square Penny an iconic Australian coin rarity.

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  • Ann Mash Promissory Note 1- 6d 161214-985
    
    			
    Note
    Ann Mash Promissory Note Circa 1812
    Quality
    Very Fine
    Provenance
    Bill Wright Collection
    Price
    $ 25,000
    comments
    We marvel at the achievements of Gina Rinehart, (Hancock Prospecting) and Katie Page (Harvey Norman) as two of Australia’s most successful businesspersons. Then consider the triumphs of convict Ann Mash who at the age of 31 was sentenced to seven years in the penal colony of New South Wales and as an emancipated convict became one of Sydney’s most successful female entrepreneurs and an active member of the colony’s business community. Testimony to the importance of the Mash promissory notes, an example is held in the Sir John Ferguson Collection, National Library of Australia Canberra

    The notes of Ann Mash are the only surviving promissory notes issued by a woman. And that makes them  extremely significant.

    Ann Mash arrived in Australia in 1790 as a convict, sentenced to seven years in the penal colony of New South Wales on board the notorious Lady Juliana, a ship of the Second Fleet.
    As an emancipated convict Ann became one of Sydney’s earliest female entrepreneurs.

    Ann was literate, intelligent and industrious. She established the first passage boat between Sydney and Parramatta and employed staff to manage it. She also became involved in a bakery, a butcher, a general store and held a wine and spirit licence for the King’s Head Tavern in Sydney.

    History records her relationships (marital and otherwise) with Richard Alley, the surgeon on the Second Fleet. Later on John Irving, the first emancipated Australian convict. And then to William Chapman, with whom she ran several profitable businesses and raised eight children all of whom grew to be respected in early Sydney.

    She is an inspiration to today’s female entrepreneurs who strive to succeed in the business community while juggling serious family commitments.

    Her promissory note of 1/- 6d, issued circa 1812, is a window into the past and is an extraordinary piece of Australian colonial history.

    The value of this note can only be enhanced with the passing of time.

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  • 1888 L C B of Aust £10 Spec Obv 0968
    1888 L C B  of Aust £10 Spec Rev 0964
    
    			
    Note
    1888 London Chartered Bank of Australia Ten Pounds
    Quality
    Uncirculated
    Provenance
    Archives of note printers Bradbury Wilkinson
    Price
    $ 9750
    comments
    This 1888 London Chartered Bank of Australia Ten Pounds presents a financial snapshot of the colony exactly 100 years after settlement. It also is a high value note. And rare as such. A Ten Pounds note was well beyond the reach of most of the colony’s residents. In 1888, a farm hand in the colony was earning 13/- per week. This colonial Ten Pounds would have represented nearly four months wages.

    That it survives today retaining its original characteristics, crisp paper and vibrant colour unaffected by the passing of time is nothing short of a miracle.

    Australia’s paper currency took on a sophisticated elegance with the establishment in 1817 of the Bank of New South Wales, the nation’s first private bank. And the issue of the bank’s circulating paper notes. The crude handwritten promissory notes that had proliferated throughout the colony soon after settlement forming an ad hoc unofficial paper currency had all but disappeared.

    The private banking system flourished in Australia after the establishment of the Bank of New South Wales. By 1841 another 23 banks had been formed, including branches of some London banks. From the 1850s gold rush to 1888, a further 32 banks had opened their doors.

    The London Chartered Bank was formed in London in 1852 and one year later established branches in both Melbourne and Sydney. In 1882, the bank opened a Brisbane branch.

    During the financial crisis of 1893 this revered establishment was forced to suspend its payments but only for four months, later re-opening its doors.

    The London Chartered Bank of Australia lives on through its subsequent mergers.  In 1921 the bank merged with the English, Scottish and Australian Bank (ES&A) which in turn amalgamated with the ANZ in 1970.

    The specimen banknotes of our Colonial Banks have been attracting solid attention over the last few years.  The reasons are clear. The notes offer genuine quality. They offer scarcity. They have a glorious, rich history. And they are being offered at a price that makes them very affordable.

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  • 19-- B of V Ltd £5 Spec Obv 1009
    19-- B of V Ltd £5 Spec Rev 1003 (1)
    
    			
    Note
    Circa 1900, Bank of Victoria Ltd Five Pounds
    Quality
    Uncirculated
    Provenance
    Archives of note printers Bradbury Wilkinson
    Price
    $ 7950
    comments
    The Bank of Victoria was founded by Dr Thomas Black, a physician from the Richmond area of Melbourne. The bank was registered in Victoria in 1852 and commenced operations in January 1853 as the Bank of Victoria Limited. By 1887 the bank had 65 branches, all in Victoria. The Bank of Victoria amalgamated with the Commercial Banking Company of Sydney Limited in 1927 and eventually became part of the National Bank of Australia in 1981. Archived for more than a century by London engravers and printers Bradbury & Wilkinson, this high denomination colonial note retains its original characteristics and colour unaffected by the passing of time.
    [X]
  • 1887 L C  B of Aust £1 Spec Obv 0986
    1887 L C B of Aust £1 Spec Rev 0978
    
    			
    Note
    1887 London Chartered Bank of Australia One Pounds
    Quality
    Uncirculated
    Provenance
    Archives of note printers Bradbury Wilkinson
    Price
    $ 7950
    comments
    The London Chartered Bank was formed in London in 1852 and one year later established branches in both Melbourne and Sydney. In 1882, the bank opened a Brisbane branch. During the financial crisis of 1893 this revered establishment was forced to suspend its payments but only for four months, later re-opening its doors. The London Chartered Bank of Australia lives on through its subsequent mergers. In 1921 the bank merged with the English, Scottish and Australian Bank (ES&A) which in turn amalgamated with the ANZ in 1970. The note has an original crispness in its paper and vibrant colours that defies time.
    [X]
  • 1852 Adwelaide Pound non date side
    1852 Adelaide Pound date side
    
    			
    Coin
    1852 Adelaide Pound Second Die
    Quality
    good Extremely Fine
    Provenance
    Private Collection Perth
    Price
    $ 42,500
    comments
    The Adelaide Pound is Australia’s most popular gold coin: the piece that most Aussie gold coin buyers want to have in their collection. Finding an Adelaide Pound that doesn’t break the bank, however, and that still meets Coinworks quality protocols is no easy task. This particular coin passes our test with flying colours. Yes it has undergone a whisper of circulation, but the rigours of every day usage have treated the coin kindly. Quality at a value-plus price. Accurately graded good Extremely Fine with just a hint of wear to the high points, the edges are undamaged and there are minimal marks in the field. This 1852 Adelaide Pound is extremely attractive to look at and is a coin that you would be proud to show your family and friends.

    The 1852 Adelaide Pound is the nation’s first coin. It was struck at the Government Assay Office in Adelaide from 22 carat gold brought from the Victorian goldfields. Its historical standing ensures that it will always be sought after.

    Fulfilling our ‘wish list’ to find an Adelaide Pound that has circulated but has minimal marks and no obvious defects, is a challenging task. Gold is a soft metal and the majority of circulated gold coins show serious blemishes including knocks to the edges: defects that are clearly visible to the naked eye.

    Not so with this Adelaide Pound. It is impressive.

    The quality standards that we adhere to in the selection of Adelaide Pounds maximises the coin’s investment potential.

    It also underpins our philosophy of buying back coins from our clients … this Adelaide Pound for instance. It was an outstanding example of an Adelaide Pound when we sold it to a Perth collector in 2004. The years have only re-affirmed that it is remains an outstanding example today.

    [X]
  • 1897 Proof Half Sov
    1897 Proof Half Sov date side
    
    			
    Coin
    1897 Proof Half Sovereign Melbourne Mint
    Quality
    FDC
    Provenance
    Murdoch, A. H. Whetmore, A. H. Baldwin
    Price
    $ 85,000
    comments
    This 1897 Proof Half Sovereign is a prized collector piece. We have traced its provenance back to the year in which it was struck when it became the property of wealthy London businessman John G Murdoch. History records that Murdoch, an avid collector, financed the striking of the proof half sovereigns in 1897 at the Melbourne Mint. Three were believed struck, each coin featuring the Veiled Head portrait of Queen Victoria. This coin, is to our knowledge, the only example out of the original mintage to be sighted on the open market.

    A remarkable history and a truly remarkable quality piece this 1897 Proof Half Sovereign is flawless, showcasing the heady quality levels sought in proof coining. It is one of the finest proof gold pieces that we have handled. A brilliant proof, both in its design detail and the state of the fields.

    Given the rarity and stunning nature of the coin – and the respect for Australian coins on the world stage - it comes as no surprise that we also see the names of foremost British collectors A. H. Whetmore and A. H. Baldwin included as former owners.

    As with all top Australian coin and banknote rarities, they eventually ‘come home’. As so it was with this coin when A H Baldwin offered the coin for sale through Spink Auctions Australia in 1978, the coin selling for $6000 on an estimate of $3000. And on each subsequent Australian auction appearance its rarity and its supreme quality have been noted with strong results realised as a consequence.

    That proof coins were struck in the nineteenth century may surprise some readers. But it has to be said that the striking of proof coins is not a modern day phenomenon. Nor a product of the decimal era.

    Australia’s mints were striking proofs of our pre-decimal coinage in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the intention was then, as it is today, to create limited mintage collector coins struck to the highest quality standards. But with two very glaring differences. The mintages more than a century ago were minuscule. And their striking was sporadic.

    For today’s buyers, the opportunities for purchase of proof gold is obviously limited by the minuscule numbers struck. And the irregularity of the issues. But there is another consideration. Great coins tend to be held.

    The availability of a gold pre-decimal proof coin – of any year - is an opportunity. If you happen to be offered one of exceptional rarity, such as this coin, then the opportunity is even more profound.

    [X]
  • Circa 1924 Twenty Pound
    Circa 1924 Twenty Pound
    
    			
    Note
    Circa 1924 Twenty Pounds
    Quality
    Specimen
    Provenance
    Private Collection Sydney
    Price
    $ 325,000
    comments
    An opportunity to acquire a piece of Australia’s banknote history that is as rare as it is significant. Discovered in London in a deceased estate, contained in an envelope dated 1924, and the only known example. It is noted that the Reserve Bank of Australia does not hold an example in its Currency Museum.

    It is pieces of the calibre of this banknote that has cemented Coinworks reputation for handling the most significant Australian currency rarities.

    Australia’s Commonwealth of Australia banknotes were introduced in 1913 with the high denomination notes of the £20, £50 and £100 issued in 1914. An interesting point on our first banknotes that the designs did not include the monarch.

    In the 1920s the Commonwealth of Australia’s banknotes underwent major design changes, the most significant of which was the inclusion of the monarch on the front of the note. The size of the notes also was significantly reduced.

    The newly designed Ten Shillings and Pound notes were first issued in 1923. The five pounds in 1924, followed by the Ten Pounds in 1925.

    The high denomination notes of £20, £50 and £100 were never re-issued, the one design remained during their lifetime.

    We do however know that there were plans to revise the designs of the high denomination notes as evidenced by this specimen.

    This note is unique. It was discovered in London via a deceased estate, contained in an envelope dated February 1924.

    The front features the Coat of Arms and at the right a profile of King George V, akin to that used on Australia’s sovereign coinage. A prominent ‘20’ lies at each corner. The under-print contains a large TWENTY in the centre of the design.

    The back of the note re-produces the Bruny Island timber-cutting scene used on the first and only £20 Commonwealth note issue.

    The note has been securely housed in an envelope for more than ninety years which has ensured that no discoloration has occurred. It is as printed. For the record, one slight (and very minor) margin tear is noted.

    This is an opportunity to acquire a piece of Australia’s banknote history that is as rare as it is significant.

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  • 1919 Type 3 Square Penny Obv Edwards 161214-876
    1919 Type 3 Square Penny Rev Edwards 161214-842
    
    			
    Coin
    1919 Type 3 Square Penny
    Quality
    Choice Uncirculated
    Provenance
    Private Collection Victoria
    Price
    $ 55,000
    comments
    What price will this coin be in 2019? And we ask this question because we are noting inordinate activity within the Kookaburra coin series. At Coinworks, recent sales of Kookaburra coins has been at a record high. We sold two square halfpennies within a calendar month, which I have only ever done once before in my forty-plus year career (1999). And we recently sold two square pennies in the same time frame. We also note over the last twelve months bidding activity amongst the dealers at auction for quality kookaburra coins. You can draw only one conclusion that at their current price levels, quality Square Kookaburra coins are undervalued and well and truly back in favour. Given the rarity of this 1919 Square Penny, its unique design traits and superb strike we know it will be sought after.

    The facts relating to this 1919 Type 3 Square Penny are as follows:

    • This coin is extremely scarce. We estimate that perhaps 15 examples of the Type 3 are known (at all quality levels).
    • The coin has been held in the one collection since 1995.
    • This coin has a design type that is unique to the Type 3. No other Square Penny bears the design.
    • This coin is superb for quality and an exception to those most commonly found.

    The value of currency in recording the mood of a nation is clearly shown in this distinguished Australian coin rarity. A wave of nationalism was sweeping Australia post World War I. The Labor Government sought to harness the mood and introduce a uniquely Australian Penny and Halfpenny, breaking away from the traditional round British coppers.

    Some may say it was the rumblings of a Republican movement way ahead of its time.

    Trials of the intended square penny coinage began at the Melbourne Mint in 1919 and continued for a further two years. Four different coin designs were tested in 1919 and we refer to them as the Type 3, 4, 5 and 6. Five were tested in 1920 and they are referred to as the Type 7, 8, 9, 10 and 13. Only two designs were tested in 1921 and we refer to them as the Type 11 and Type 12.

    The test pieces were ultimately given to dignitaries and Government officials to assess their reaction.

    The response was poor. There was a general public resistance to change, while the elderly rejected the small size of the coins. However, the final decision not to proceed seems to have been based mainly on another consideration – the large number of vending machines then in operation required a circular penny.

    The impetus for change was further eroded when William Watt, the most influential advocate of the nickel kookaburras, suddenly resigned his position as Treasurer before the necessary regulations were in place.

    The kookaburra coins never went into production and Australia lost a great opportunity to go its own way. But with only the 200 prototypes to show as evidence of the Government’s grand scheme, Australian coinage gained another wonderful collector piece.

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  • 1917 Proof Sixpence date non side
    1917 Proof Sixpence date side
    
    			
    Coin
    1917 Proof Sixpence
    Quality
    Superb FDC
    Provenance
    Madrid Collection 1994, Private Collection Melbourne 2005
    Price
    $ 40,000
    comments
    This 1917 Proof Sixpence was struck 99 years ago. Next year is the centenary of its issue. It was a coin of national significance when it was struck, the very first Commonwealth proof coin struck at the Melbourne Mint. The historical impact of its striking will resonate throughout the industry in 2017, during its centenary year.

    Proof coins were struck a century ago to the same principles as they are today by the Royal Australian Mint. The intention was then, as it is today, to create limited mintage show pieces struck to the highest quality standards. With one startling difference. The mintages.

    This is the only Proof 1917 Sixpence that we have sighted. We are aware that one is held in the Museum of Victoria Archives which is testimony to the coin’s importance.

    Sold privately in 1994 to the famed Madrid Collection, then to a private collector in Melbourne in 2005, this coin has changed hands only twice over the last twenty two years. And that is a typical holding pattern for most top rarities. Coins of this ilk are quite literally once-in-a-decade opportunities.

    So what makes this coin so special? And why don’t we see more of them popping up?

    This Proof 1917 Sixpence was struck to record the mint’s coining achievements in 1917 by the creation of one stunning showpiece coin: a magnificent model piece. The coin was also used to showcase the mint’s coining skills by being on show at Exhibitions or sent to other mint’s that came under the Royal Mint umbrella.

    The production of proofs in this era necessitated a ‘kid-gloves’ approach and was labour intensive: hence the limited numbers struck.

    • The blanks were hand-picked, highly polished to produce a coin that has a mirror shine and ice-smooth fields.
    • The blanks were hardened and brushed to ensure that the design was sharp and almost three-dimensional in its appearance.
    • The dies were struck twice to create a sharp, well-defined design.
    • The rims encircling the coins were always high, creating a picture frame effect and encasing the coin. The pristine nature of the striking is particularly evident in the denticles. They are crisp and uniformly spaced around the circumference of the coin.

    This is a rare opportunity to acquire an important piece of Australia’s coinage history.

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  • 1852 Adelaide Cracked Die date side
    1852 Adelaide Cracked Die
    
    			
    Coin
    1852 Adelaide Pound First or Cracked Die
    Quality
    about Extremely Fine
    Provenance
    Private Collection Sydney
    Price
    $ 105,000
    comments
    This coin will make owning the famous Cracked Die a reality for just one buyer. It is a solid example and, given its extreme rarity, it also is well priced. Our experience affirms its rarity. In a career that spans forty-plus years we have handled less than ten Cracked Dies.

    It is the reverse of this 1852 Adelaide Pound that defines its extreme scarcity. The coin bears the tell-tale crack in the DWT area of the legend and features a beaded inner circle design encasing the value of One Pound. We refer to the coin as the First Die or Cracked Die Adelaide Pound.

    The coin was minted at the Government Assay Office in Adelaide and is the nation’s very first gold coin affording it a unique position in history. Furthermore the Cracked Die is rare with less than forty examples available to private collectors, across all levels of quality. 

    First die? Cracked Die? Second die? It all sounds a little bit pedantic but it is a fact that two different dies were used in the production of the Adelaide Pound. The first featured a beaded inner circle and produced approximately 40 coins before a die crack was noticed. (That’s why the terms First Die and Cracked Die are synonymous.)

    A second die, featuring a crenellated inner circle, was then taken up and was used to strike a further 24,600-plus coins.

    Not only is there a distinct design difference between the coins struck from the first and second die, what is obvious from the figures is that those Adelaide Pounds struck using the first die are incredibly rare.

    Having accepted the rarity of the coin we now move on to discuss the quality levels that are available to buyers.

    It is a fact that the majority of Adelaide Pounds from the first run are found today well worn. And that is not surprising. Because the die cracked, it was viewed as being faulty, so very few examples out of the first run were kept as souvenirs. A scan of auction records from the early 1950s up until the present also shows that many Cracked Dies have been mounted and used in jewellery pieces, further reducing the pool of quality examples available to buyers.

    Rare in any quality, this Cracked Die Adelaide Pound is especially scarce in the superior quality level offered here.

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  • 1927 Proof Canberra Florin
    1927 Proof Canberra Florin date side
    
    			
    Coin
    1927 Proof Canberra Florin
    Quality
    FDC
    Provenance
    Private Collection Melbourne
    Price
    $ 35,000
    comments
    The Australian Government authorised the release of this limited edition collector coin in 1927 to commemorate the opening of Parliament House in Canberra. To commemorate this momentous occasion, the Government authorised the release of a limited edition collector coin. It was the Melbourne Mint’s very first collector coin issue, the coins selling for a sixpence premium over face value. And it was Australia’s very first commemorative coin. We know the coin today as the 1927 Proof Canberra Florin. And it is a prized collector piece.

    His Royal Highness the Duke of York, officially opened Parliament House in Australia’s national capital, Canberra on 9 May 1927. In front of a massive crowd, the Duke of York opened the parliamentary doors with a golden key and unveiled a statue of his father King George V in the foyer.

    To commemorate this momentous occasion, the Government authorised the release of a limited edition collector coin. It was the Melbourne Mint’s very first collector coin issue, the coins selling for a sixpence premium over face value. And it was Australia’s very first commemorative coin.

    We know the coin today as the 1927 Proof Canberra Florin. And it is a prized collector piece.

    The release of the 1927 Proof Canberra Florin was a well-publicised event that saw the coins sell to members of the public outside traditional numismatic circles. Coins being mishandled or pieces simply lost into circulation was the fate of many of the proofs out of the original mintage of 400. So a small mintage of coins becomes even smaller for the buyer seeking a quality Proof Canberra Florin.

    In today’s market we might see one premium quality Proof Canberra Florin on the market every year. And we stress the inclusion of the word ‘premium’ in this statement.

    This particular 1927 Proof Canberra Florin is a premium quality example and is classified as FDC, with brilliant mirror fields. The coin shows the characteristic striations associated with Proof Canberra Florins which reflects meticulous die preparation.  Moreover, it has been sharply struck and brilliantly preserved.  Visually it is stunning.

    As an historic piece and as a finite asset, the rarity of the 1927 Proof Canberra Florin is assured. As an exquisite example of the Melbourne Mint's craftsmanship, the coin is a numismatic gem.

     

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  • 1916 Specimen Penny
    1916 Specimen Penny
    
    			
    Coin
    1916 Specimen Penny
    Quality
    Specimen
    Provenance
    Barrie Winsor
    Price
    $ 29,500
    comments
    Barrie Winsor is a respected numismatist and was the guiding hand behind the formation of the now famous Quartermaster Collection. He also was the former owner of this spectacular 1916 Specimen Penny.

    The coin is sharply struck and under the glass, it shows the heavy striations associated with distinct die preparation. Brilliantly preserved, it is offered today a century after it was struck, with beautiful blue / purple / golden toning.

    This is the third only 1916 Specimen Penny that we have offered in a career that spans forty-plus years. While it is true that we have sighted more than three examples … this coin and the other two examples sold many years ago are the only pieces that we rate highly.

    The date 1916 is a pivotal one for the numismatic industry.

    It was the very first year that the Melbourne Mint struck our silver Commonwealth coins. And the first year that the Bombay Mint began minting our pennies and halfpennies.

    The discovery of this superb copper rarity is therefore timely.

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  • 1872 Melb Mint Sov non date side
    1872 Melb Mint Sov date side
    
    			
    Coin
    1872 Sovereign Melbourne Mint
    Quality
    Choice Uncirculated
    Provenance
    Barrie Winsor Collection
    Price
    $ 24,500
    comments
    This 1872 Sovereign is pivotal to Australia’s gold coin history for it represents the very first year of sovereign production at the Melbourne Mint and depicts the Young Head design of Queen Victoria with the St George reverse. Not only the first year of production at the mint in Melbourne, but this coin has the lowest recorded mintage of the entire Young Head Shield series, from both the Sydney and Melbourne Mint. (History records that the dies dated 1872 did not reach the Melbourne Mint until April of that year.)

    The supreme quality of this 1872 Sovereign makes it even more appealing. Presented in Choice Uncirculated, the coin is immaculately struck and highly detailed. Furthermore, it has been brilliantly preserved for the coin has smooth surfaces and strong edges.

    Historical records reveal that the Melbourne Mint was experiencing problems with its sovereign production in its first year of operation which makes the quality of this particular sovereign all the more remarkable. 

     

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  • 1873 Sovereign Sydney Mint head
    1873 Sovereign Sydney Mint
    
    			
    Coin
    1873 Sovereign Sydney Mint
    Quality
    Choice Uncirculated
    Provenance
    Paul Terry, Tom Hadley
    Price
    $ 7,950
    comments
    As far as gold coins are concerned, the line-up of Paul Terry, Barrie Winsor and Tom Hadley is almost unbeatable. You just know the coin has to be supreme for quality. And this 1873 Sovereign struck at the Sydney Mint is certainly just that. It is a sensational coin. Featuring the Young Head portrait of Queen Victoria and St George & the Dragon reverse this 1873 Sydney Mint Sovereign represents a perfect combination of superb quality, revered provenance and value for money.
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